Tuesday, July 18, 2006

An Inconvenient Truth

Has anyone yet seen this? Love to hear thoughts and reflections. Nice website. Looks like the US got it well before anywhere else. Also interesting to see a group called Restoring Eden offering free tix to 'Bible-believing Christians'. Check out the trailer below. Having recently watched Four Corners on Peak Oil, I'm wondering whether the warming catastrophe is looking relatively small and far off...

UPDATE: there is a good review over at The Fire and the Rose.

14 comments:

Drew said...

Am going to see it Tuesday week... I'll get back to you shortly :)

byron said...

Where? And what time? Maybe we could see it together?

Aaron G said...

I blogged on this film earlier. Is it out in Australia now?

Drew said...

Today's SMH:

"This is the mystery. Polls show we worry about climate change, but we vote from the hip pocket. John Howard, the polls tell us, makes us feel safe. But we blind ourselves to the yawning chasm between feeling safe and being safe. Ask the ostrich."

They call it the issue of the century...

Rachel said...

Hey hey Byron! yes I too have joined the blogging ranks. Re: Peak oil Alex and I are going to screen The End Of Suburbia at Barnies soon - check out www.endofsuburbia.com. Also re: climate change TEAR are just about to take on climate change as their new campaign very exciting.
Also I found some very interseting and scarry (the scarry being comments along the lines of why should christians be bothered by this- shouldn't we just be preaching the gospel?) postings on the sydney anglicans forum pages re peak oil. I'll send you when I find the link.
Rachel

byron said...

Hi Rachel - good to see you round these parts! And I've now linked to your new blog. When is the doco going to be shown at Barneys? Christian apathy about the environment (and a whole range of associated issues) is so depressing. The good becomes the enemy of the best, or so irrelevant in the face of it that it's not worth doing anything.

Rachel said...

Currently in negotiations with staff re time/place but it will be advertised across services. We're hoping to get Dave Lankshear ( www.eclipsenow.org ) along. The doco is amazing because it doesn't just diagnose as so much social commentary does these days (Fisk Roy etc) it offers hope. I think Ted Trainer ( http://socialwork.arts.unsw.edu.au/tsw/ ) has had visions of such possibilities for a while. It is really inspiring to think of how the church could be leaders rather than late-comers on this one as the implications for society are huge.

Anonymous said...

What a nice change that would be!

byron said...

What a nice change that would be!
Looking forward to it. Let me know when a decision is made.

Hey Drew: that was a great SMH article today. Great quotes from Attenborough and Schwarzenegger. Check out this one too if you haven't already seen it. Two major articles in the Herald on a single day. Perhaps something is changing...

One of Freedom said...

I know too many Christians who not only don't want to care about the damage we've been doing to the environment, but they grasp at anything they can to justify their "position". I think it has a lot to do with their level of discomfort - Christians can be some of the most apathetic and fatalistic people out there. The worst is the gnostic dichotomy of earth/flesh/world = bad, heaven/spirit = good. I read this last night and it leaps to mind here - "TO THE despisers of the body will I speak my word. I wish them neither to learn afresh, nor teach anew, but only to bid farewell to their own bodies,- and thus be dumb." (Nietzsche).

byron said...

Frank: Great quote. Keep the Nietzsche coming! As for your comment, I couldn't agree more. Gnostic = bad. Creational/incarnational/new creational = good, very good!

D.W. Congdon said...

I just posted on it.

byron said...

Well, well, even Pat Robertson has changed his mind. Freedom of conscience (which really means freedom to repent, as O'Donovan argues in Desire of the Nations) truly is a gift worth defending. Others, however, continue to excercise their freedom in other ways. Not that I'm knocking this - the argument that ratifying Kyoto might do more harm to the world's poor than ignoring it is one that needs to be heard and carefully evaluated.

byron said...

And of course, the fact that it was inevitable doesn't make it any less humourous. (Thanks to boxologies for these links).