Tuesday, October 21, 2008

A fun little animation


Wake Up, Freak Out - then Get a Grip from Leo Murray on Vimeo.
What effect ought potential catastrophes have on our collective moral deliberations and resolutions? This short film is one example of a discourse pattern that seems quite common. How valid are its moves? I am not here asking about the validity of its empirical claims about the present state or causes of climate change,* but the rhetorical and ethical resources this kind of discourse marshals to shape collective deliberations.
For the animator's own discussion and disclaimers on this topic, see here.

4 comments:

Named One said...

Really good animation. I like the fact that your doctoral dissertation seems to be focused on the environmental crises. i think changing the churches thinking at large on these issues could have a massive impact.
I myself am often befuddled by this problem. I try to consume less. I recycle. I only buy "Simple" shoes( simpleshoes.com.I walk or car pool whenever possible and I am seriously looking into purchasing an electric car.

Named One said...

By the way, in the more conservative branches (such as the Southern Baptist in the US) these critical issues are peripheral at best. I grew up Southern Baptist and my parents still are and while there are many commendable aspects of their faith and theology their lack of ecological sensitivity is frightening. Ecology often considered a liberal (non-christian) political issue.

Michael Canaris said...

By telescoping a substantial array of sources fairly quickly, that video reminds me a touch of Cicero's oration In C. Verrem Actio Prima.

Michael Canaris said...

For that in English, try one could do worse than try here.